R & J audition sides

DUKE/CHORUS

   Two households, both alike in dignity,                                                     families, rank
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,                          rivalry, outbreaks, fighting
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.                                                     civilian
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes                                fateful, children   1.0.5
A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life,                                                        doomed
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows                        unfortunate, pitiful, downfall
Doth2 with their death bury their parents’ strife.                                  do+, end, fighting
The fearful passage of their death-mark’d love,                                                 doomed
And the continuance of their parents’ rage,                                                           1.0.10
Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove,                      except for, nothing
Is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage.                                                 performance
The which if you with patient ears attend,                                                              listen
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.                                                  play

 

 

MONTAGUE

   Many a morning hath he there been seen,
With tears augmenting the fresh morning dew,                                               adding to
Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs.
But all so soon as the all-cheering sun                                                          as soon as
Should in the furthest east begin to draw
The shady curtains from Aurora‘s bed,                                                       god of dawn
Away from the light steals home my heavy son,                 comes home, sad   1.1.140
And private in his chamber pens himself,                                              bedroom, locks
Shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight out,
And makes himself an artificial night.
Black and portentous must this humor prove,                                    foreboding, mood
Unless good counsel may the cause remove.                          advice, remove the cause

 

CAPULET

And too soon marred are those so early made.                                                     harmed
[The]+ earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she;                           grave, other children
She is+ the hopeful lady of my earth.   she’s2,                      of my earthly body (my offspring)
But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart.
My will to her consent is but a part.                           my wishes are less important than hers
And, she agreed, within her scope of choice                                                      if she agrees
Lies my consent and fair according voice.                                                                 agreeing
This night I hold an old accustomed feast,                                                   customary   1.2.20
Whereto I have invited many a guest
Such as I love; and you among the store,                                                            whom, group
One more, most welcome, makes my number more.
Come, go with me.

 

SERVANT

   Madam, the guests are come, supper served up,                                     have come
you called, my young lady asked for,                                          they’re calling for you
the Nurse cursed in the pantry, and                                                        is being cursed
everything in extremity. I must hence                                            is in chaos, go away
to wait. I beseech you, follow straight.                               wait tables, beg, right away

 

 

 

 

MERCUTIO

And sometime comes she with a tithe-pig‘s tail                  pig donated to the church
Tickling a parson‘s nose as he+ lies asleep,                                   clergyman   1.4.85
Then he dreams of another benefice.                                getting more church money
Sometime she driveth o’er a soldier’s neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,           crossing enemy lines, ambushes
Of healths five-fathom deep, and then anon                       long drinking bouts, soon
Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes,                                 is startled   1.4.91
And being thus frighted swears a prayer or two
And sleeps again. This is that very Mab
That plats the manes of horses in the night,                                                          braids
And bakes the elflocks in foul sluttish hairs,                           mats the hair of old hags
Which once untangled, much misfortune bodes.             brings misfortune (superstition)
This is the hag, when maids lie on their backs,                                                         1.4.97
That presses them and learns them first to bear,             teaches, bear children (bawdy)
Making them women of good carriage.

 

ROMEO

   I fear too early, for my mind misgives                                                                   fears
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars                                                              still
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date                                                                     1.4.115
With this night’s revels, and expire the term                                        party, end the life
Of a despised life closed in my breast                                                        my hated life
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.                                                 evil, early death
But He that hath the steerage of my course
Direct my sail1!—On, lusty gentlemen!                               suit2, let’s go, merry   1.4.120

 

 

 

ROMEO

   O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like1 a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear,                                                    as2, Ethiopian’s
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!                                                everyday use
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows,                          appears, white, among
As yonder lady o’er her fellows shows.                                    that, stands out   1.5.56
The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand,                         dance, where she goes
And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand.                 touching her hand, rough
Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight,                               before, deny it, eyes
For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.

 

 

TYBALT   [aside]                                                                                                  1.5.61
This, by his voice, should be a Montague!                                                             must
[to Page(20)] Fetch me my rapier, boy. [Page exits]                                          sword
                                                 What, dares the slave                                      scumbag
Come hither, covered with an antic face,                                                       here, mask
To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?                                                        sneer, festivity
Now, by the stock and honor of my kin,                                                              family
To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin! [starts to go]

 

 

 

JULIET                                                                                                                   2.2.41
‘Tis but thy name that is my2 enemy.                                                            only, mine1
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.                          you would still be yourself if
What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part1
Belonging to a man.2 O, be some other name!1                                                    2.2.45
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name1 would smell as sweet.                                                           word2
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes                                                             owns
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,                                              discard   2.2.50
And for that1 name, which is no part of thee,                                in exchange for, thy2
Take all myself.                                                                                         take all of me

 

FRIAR

   The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
Check’ring the eastern clouds with streaks of light,
And fleckled darkness like a drunkard reels                                      dappled, staggers
From forth day’s path and Titan’s fiery1 wheels. out of the way of, burning2: sun-chariot
Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye,                                   before, raises   2.3.5
The day to cheer and night’s dank dew to dry,
I must up-fill this osier cage of ours                                                                     basket
With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.                                              harmful
O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies                           great, healing power   2.3.15
In plants, herbs, stones, and their true qualities.                                                 extracts
For naught so vile that on the earth doth live                                       nothing is so evil
But to the earth some special good doth give,                                               humankind
Within the infant rind of this weak flower                                                              frail
Poison hath residence and medicine power.                                                         2.3.24

 

1st GUARD                                                                                                          5.3.177
The ground is bloody. Search about the churchyard.
Go, some of you. Whoe’er you find attach.                                                          arrest

[Some Guards(20) exit]
Pitiful sight! Here lies the County slain,                                                             5.3.180
And Juliet bleeding, warm, and newly dead,
Who here hath lain these two days burièd.
Go, tell the Prince. Run to the Capulets.
Raise up the Montagues. Some others search.                                                       wake

[More Guards exit(12)]
We see the ground whereon these woes do lie,                                     bodies   5.3.185
But the true ground of all these piteous woes                                           reason, pitiful
We cannot without circumstance descry.                                              details, discover

 

 

BALTHASAR                                                                                                        5.1.18
Then she is well and nothing can be ill.                        she’s in heaven (an expression)
Her body sleeps in Capel’s monument,                                               the Capulet tomb
And her immortal part with angels lives.                                                                 soul
I saw her laid low in her kindred’s vault,                                                  family’s tomb
And presently took post to tell it you.                                 immediately rented a horse
O, pardon me for bringing these ill news,                                                                bad
Since you did leave it for my office, sir.                                                make it my duty

 

LADY CAPULET                                                                                                  1.3.75
Well, think of marriage now. Younger than you,
Here in Verona, ladies of esteem                                                             high-breeding
Are made already mothers. By my count
I was your mother much upon these years                                            at the same age
That you are now a maid. Thus then in brief:
The valiant Paris seeks you for his love.